In The News

Human malaria parasites grown for the first time in dormant form
Human malaria parasites grown for the first time in dormant form

Novel technology could allow researchers to develop and test new antimalaria drugs.

Urban heat island effects depend on a city’s layout
Urban heat island effects depend on a city’s layout

The way streets and buildings are arranged makes a big difference in how heat builds up, study shows.

Exploring his depth of field
Exploring his depth of field

Photographer, poet, and PhD student in biological engineering Corban Swain pursues diverse interests with a keen eye.

Robo-picker grasps and packs
Robo-picker grasps and packs

New robotic system could lend a hand with warehouse sorting and other picking or clearing tasks.

Houston gives a Texas-sized welcome to the MIT Better World Tour
Houston gives a Texas-sized welcome to the MIT Better World Tour

At the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, alumni and friends celebrate the creativity and strength of MIT and the city of Houston.

Seeking materials that match the brain
Seeking materials that match the brain

Polina Anikeeva explores ways to make neural probes that are compatible with delicate biological tissues.

Four MIT faculty elected to the National Academy of Engineering for 2018
Four MIT faculty elected to the National Academy of Engineering for 2018

New members have made advances in the development of plasticity, novel genetic evolution methods, systems modeling, and clean energy.

Integrated simulations answer 20-year-old question in fusion research
Integrated simulations answer 20-year-old question in fusion research

Study finds that turbulence competes in fusion plasmas to rapidly respond to temperature perturbations.

Researchers advance CRISPR-based tool for diagnosing disease
Researchers advance CRISPR-based tool for diagnosing disease

With SHERLOCK, a strip of paper can now indicate presence of pathogens, tumor DNA, or any genetic signature of interest.

System draws power from daily temperature swings
System draws power from daily temperature swings

Technology developed at MIT can harness temperature fluctuations of many kinds to produce electricity.

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