Engineering In Action

Making steel with electricity
Making steel with electricity

Steel is one of the most useful materials on the planet. A backbone of modern life, it’s used in skyscrapers, cars, airplanes, bridges, and more. Unfortunately, steelmaking is an extremely dirty process.

“Pathways to Invention” documentary debuts on PBS, streaming
“Pathways to Invention” documentary debuts on PBS, streaming

The Lemelson-MIT Program has announced the national debut of an award-winning documentary that celebrates invention: American Public Television (APT) presents “Pathways to Invention,” a film that follows modern inventors of diverse backgrounds as they develop life-changing innovations.

Unlocking mRNA’s cancer-fighting potential
Unlocking mRNA’s cancer-fighting potential

What if training your immune system to attack cancer cells was as easy as training it to fight Covid-19? Many people believe the technology behind some Covid-19 vaccines, messenger RNA, holds great promise for stimulating immune responses to cancer.

Device could jumpstart work toward quantum internet
Device could jumpstart work toward quantum internet

In research that could jumpstart work toward the quantum internet, researchers at MIT and the University of Cambridge have built and tested an exquisitely small device that could allow the quick, efficient flow of quantum information over large distances.

Safer skies with self-flying helicopters
Safer skies with self-flying helicopters

In late 2019, after years of studying aviation and aerospace engineering, Hector (Haofeng) Xu decided to learn to fly helicopters. At the time, he was pursuing his PhD in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, so he was familiar with the risks associated with flying small aircraft. But something about being in the cockpit gave Xu a greater appreciation of those risks. After a couple of nerve-wracking experiences, he was inspired to make helicopter flight safer.

The future of motorcycles could be hydrogen
The future of motorcycles could be hydrogen

MIT’s Electric Vehicle Team, which has a long record of building and racing innovative electric vehicles, including cars and motorcycles, in international professional-level competitions, is trying something very different this year: The team is building a hydrogen-powered electric motorcycle, using a fuel cell system, as a testbed for new hydrogen-based transportation.

How to be an astronaut
How to be an astronaut

The first question a student asked Warren “Woody” Hoburg ’08 during his visit to MIT's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AeroAstro) this November was: “It seems like there’s no real way to know if being an astronaut is something you could really do. Are there any activities we can try out and see if astronaut-related things are something we might want to do?”

The Beaver visits Father Sky: Meet MIT’s First Nations Launch team
The Beaver visits Father Sky: Meet MIT’s First Nations Launch team

Earlier this year, MIT’s First Nations Launch team participated in the 2023 First Nations Launch, an international NASA-Artemis Student Challenge hosted by the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium that focuses on Indigenous representation and science in aerospace engineering through rocketry. It was the first time MIT has ever competed in this challenge, now in its 15th year.

Novo Nordisk supports MIT postdocs working at the intersection of AI and life sciences
Novo Nordisk supports MIT postdocs working at the intersection of AI and life sciences

MIT’s School of Engineering and global health care company Novo Nordisk today announced the launch of a multi-year program to support postdoctoral fellows conducting research at the intersection of AI and data science with life sciences. The MIT-Novo Nordisk Artificial Intelligence Postdoctoral Fellows Program will welcome its first cohort of up to 10 postdoctoral fellows for a two-year term this fall. The program will provide up to $10 million for an annual cohort of up to 10 postdoctoral fellows for two-year terms.

Coming soon to the Infinite Corridor: A space to explore the infinitesimal
Coming soon to the Infinite Corridor: A space to explore the infinitesimal

It started with a cat. A figurine kitty with a blue-green patina that indicated it was made of copper that had oxidized.

But was it? Maria Aguiar, a sophomore in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), didn’t know. So back in December, she told her mechanics class instructor about the figurine, a souvenir from a friend who had visited Greece.

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