Engineering In Action

An Unexpected Ambition Borne from MIT Experience
An Unexpected Ambition Borne from MIT Experience

Senior Annamarie Bair was determined to become a medical doctor when she arrived at MIT from the Midwest nearly four years ago. She was fascinated by neuroscience but had yet to channel that passion toward what became her true focus: artificial intelligence and health care.

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Engineering Joy
Engineering Joy

MIT senior Isabel “Izzy” Lloyd will graduate this spring with not only a degree in mechanical engineering, but with the pleasure of knowing she accomplished a goal she set for herself as a freshman: to impact those around her in a truly positive way.

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Computation Counts
Computation Counts

When James Quigley applied to MIT, he didn’t need an algorithm to tell him getting in wasn’t a high-probability outcome. An Army veteran attending community college in California, he possessed a talent for math, a desire to do big things, and a sobering group of friends who insisted: “Mortals don’t get into MIT.” Quigley knew a dare when he heard one. As for probability measures, those he chose to ignore.

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Making Music with The Chorallaries of MIT
Making Music with The Chorallaries of MIT

How do you transform emotion from the soul, through the body, to the voice, and elicit a physiological response from the audience? Mechanical engineering senior Isabel "Izzy" Lloyd and fellow members of the MIT Chorallaries a capella group figure out this complex transformation every time they get together and sing.

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Artificial Intelligence in Action
Artificial Intelligence in Action

A person watching videos that show things opening — a door, a book, curtains, a blooming flower, a yawning dog — easily understands the same type of action is depicted in each clip.

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Magical Bob
Magical Bob

As a child, Institute Professor Robert S. Langer was captivated by the “magic” of the chemical reactions in a toy chemistry set. Decades later, he continues to be enchanted by the potential of chemical engineering. He is the most cited engineer in the world, and shows no signs of slowing down, despite four decades of ground-breaking work in drug delivery and polymer research.

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3Q: Daron Acemoglu on Technology and the Future of Work
3Q: Daron Acemoglu on Technology and the Future of Work

K. Daron Acemoglu, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT, is a leading thinker on the labor market implications of artificial intelligence, robotics, automation, and new technologies. His innovative work challenges the way people think about how these technologies intersect with the world of work. In 2005, he won the John Bates Clark Medal, an honor shared by a number of Nobel Prize recipients and luminaries in the field of economics.

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Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone
Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone

This month is Independent Activities Period (IAP) at MIT, a four-week period when students, faculty, staff, and alumni organize and engage in all kinds of inventive and wacky sessions that range from relaxing to rigorous.

Putting Projects at the Forefront
Putting Projects at the Forefront

Rose Wang loves to work on projects — especially ones that exceed the bounds of her declared majors, economics and computer science. She thrives on do-it-yourself design solutions. Her latest involves making an aerodynamic drone. “We’ll see how that goes,” she says.

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Building 31 Powers Back Up
Building 31 Powers Back Up

A $52 million renovation of the 90-year-old Building 31 on MIT’s campus has transformed the space into a gleaming home for research in autonomy, turbomachinery, energy storage, and transportation. The three-year project added nearly 7,000 square feet of new space and doubled Building 31's capacity for faculty, students, and researchers.

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