ENGINEERING IN ACTION

  • Fabrics Are the Future

    Fabrics Are the Future

    Yoel Fink stands under an unassuming LED ceiling lamp wearing what appears to be just an ordinary baseball cap. “Do you hear it?” he asks. Semiconductor technology within the fibers of the hat is converting the audio encoded in light pulses to electrical pulses, he explains, and those pulses are then converted to sound. “This is one of the first examples of an advanced fabric. It looks like an ordinary hat but it’s really a sophisticated optical communication system.”
  • Decoding Language Barriers

    Decoding Language Barriers

    “Learning a new language gives you a window into someone else’s world,” says Virginia Adams, who graduated from MIT this past May. For Adams, learning Chinese has given her a glimpse into a fascinating, fast-paced culture where technology is rapidly advancing. As a MISTI (MIT International Science & Technology Initiatives) intern at Tencent, a large technology company in Shenzhen, China, Adams hones her ability to communicate with her Chinese co-workers and friends in order to better build the programs that instruct computers to communicate.
  • MIT Alumnus and GM Engineer Returns to Campus to Inspire Student Innovation

    MIT Alumnus and GM Engineer Returns to Campus to Inspire Student Innovation

    Will Dickson ’14 has parked General Motors’ first self-driving vehicle, the Cruise AV, on campus and invited MIT students to think flexibly about its design opportunities. “You are future engineers and thought leaders in the area of new machines,” he says. “How do you design future vehicles like this one better for a safe and autonomous experience?”
  • MIT-SenseTime Alliance Funds Projects from All Five Schools

    MIT-SenseTime Alliance Funds Projects from All Five Schools

    Faculty and senior researchers at MIT are teaming up in unprecedented ways to help define the next frontier in human and machine intelligence with projects that delve into everything from fundamental research to societal applications for new technologies.
  • A Summer Tune-Up for Industry Professionals

    A Summer Tune-Up for Industry Professionals

    Kristala Jones Prather is speaking in a packed MIT lecture hall. Many of her students wear reading glasses, some have a little less hair than they used to, and most of them are well dressed and groomed. But all of these engineers, biologists, chemists, microbiologists, and biochemists take furious notes in thick course binders and lean forward to study the equations she jots on the chalkboard.

IN THE NEWS

Technique quickly identifies extreme event statistics
Machine-learning model provides risk assessment for complex nonlinear systems, including boats and offshore platforms. go
A step toward personalized, automated smart homes
System that automatically identifies people moving around indoors could enable self-adjusting homes. go

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